February 2nd, 2014 superbowl vegan artichoke and spinach dip in a bread bowl posted by malloreigh in Photos & Recipes & Snacks

i looked up so many spinach and artichoke dip recipes and just could not find what i wanted. i didn’t want low-fat, i didn’t want a complex multi-day cashew soaking process, and i didn’t want fake cheese. i ended up just throwing some ingredients together and wound up with a simple, delicious, and satisfying dip that was exactly what my friends and i were craving for our superbowl-themed movie watching party.

1 bag washed fresh spinach OR 1 package frozen spinach, thawed and drained
1 can artichoke hearts packed in water
2 cloves garlic, fresh
about 1/4 cup vegan mayonnaise
about 1/4 cup vegan sour cream
about 1 tsp paprika
salt and pepper to taste
one round loaf of bread, any kind you like (optional)

preheat oven to 350f if you will be eating this right away.

if you are using fresh spinach, throw it into a dry skillet heated to medium-low and let the water steam off until it wilts. press the spinach up against the side of the pan to release the water and allow it to steam off. if you are using frozen spinach, thaw it and drain it well.

combine all ingredients in a food processor and process til blended. if you don’t have a food processor, mince everything and mix it well.

using a bread knife, cut a circle around the top of the bread and hollow it out. chop the hollowed bread into cubes. place the bread bowl and cubes on a baking sheet and fill the bowl with the mixed dip. bake for 15-25 minutes based on how hungry you are.

for a gluten-free dip, bake it in a small baking dish or large ramekin and use tortilla chips.

i can’t believe this is all i did. i don’t normally have vegan sour cream in the house but someone left some in my fridge from a cookoff recently. and i DO always have vegan mayonnaise and so should you because it’s the best. vegenaise specifically.

March 11th, 2013 Let’s Talk About Tofu Scramble posted by malloreigh in Breakfast/Brunch & Photos

Tofu scramble: the most beautiful of vegan breakfasts. Getting it at a restaurant is usually disappointing; I’ve never once had a scram at a restaurant that was as good as the one I make at home. My recipe is here: Malloreigh’s Semi-Famous Tofu Scramble. Like all of my tried-and-true recipes, this one is approximate. I alter all of the ingredients every time I make it, depending on how thick my coconut milk is, what type of mustard I’m using, and what vegetables I have. The consistencies are important, too, though – always get that tofu sauced up before you start chopping your onion for maximum flavour. Never put too much liquid in it or it’ll be tough to brown it before you add your veg. Be prepared to adjust, because the taste of tofu is crappy, and the taste of flavour is AWESOME.

So that’s the most recent scram I made, on Saturday morning. It was the same formula as usual – coconut milk, nutritional yeast, mustard, and fenugreek leaves for the tofu, plus vegetables. I used a nice seedy dijon mustard which added a good texture and flavour… I will do this again! Also, I added a whole bunch of kale, torn into pieces. Remember always to discard the stalks as they are woody and fibrous… but get every bit of that leaf in there, yum. I added the kale and zucchini when the tofu was pretty much done (letting it sit on top of the tofu), tossed a bit of the liquid from my coconut milk in, and put a top on to let it steam til it was bright green. Then I stirred it all together and cooked it for a bit longer to get all the flavours infused.

This was possibly one of the best scrambles I’ve ever made.

I hope that when folks make my scramble recipe, they are taste-testing and adjusting as they go. It can and should be improved upon! I started making this scramble six or seven years ago and I’m still improving it. YUM

February 26th, 2013 trini doubles, yum yum yum posted by malloreigh in Breakfast/Brunch & Lunch & Photos & Recipes & Sides & Snacks

Hello there, friends and vegans! It’s been a while since last I posted; I’ve been working full time AND going to school full time, so I hope you’ll forgive me.

Anyway, I wanted to post about my entry in the last vegan cookoff. Just to refresh your memory, the cookoff is a monthly event some friends and I have been doing for four (count em, FOUR) years solid. Everything has to be vegan, and these days, nut-free as well, and it suits the purposes of the aspiring winner to offer a gluten-free entry or option as well, as we have three gluten-free participants. The theme, date, and location is chosen the month before. Everyone brings the components of their dish, assembles on location, and serves small portions to all of the attendees. At the end, everyone who’s eaten votes in each of five categories, and a winner is crowned.


The photo of mine hasn’t been uploaded yet, so here’s one from Tried and True Favourite Recipes!

Our last competition was Caribbean-themed. I made Trini doubles – a street food dish from Trinidad involving chana masala (my favourite Indian dish made with island flavour) stuffed into deep-fried bread dough. It’s simple and it’s delicious. I chose to serve mine with a fresh salsa made of mango, cucumber, lime, jalapeno, and cilantro. The whole thing was quite hot, but so delicious!

Chana Masala for Doubles

Now, I’ve tried to make chana many times before and have never made an authentic-tasting one. This was my first success with a chana masala that tasted like I’ve had it in restaurants.

2 tbsp sunflower/canola/veg oil
1 medium yellow onion, diced
1 tsp caraway or coriander seeds, whole
4 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
1.5 inches thick ginger or 2 inches thin, grated
2 tbsp+ masala mix or chana masala mix powder (NOT garam masala, NOT thai red curry, etc.)
2 cans chickpeas, or 3 cups cooked chickpeas
1 small can or 1/2 large can diced tomatoes (ensure you get ones without extra spices)
1 bay leaf

Heat a medium-sized pot on just under medium heat on a burner. Add oil and let it heat for a minute before adding the onions. They should sizzle slightly, but if they spit at all, turn the heat down. Stoves vary a lot, so it’s best to know whether your stove runs hot or cool. Mine runs hot, so I saute my onions on heat 2 or 3 (electric). Gas ranges often run hotter than electric because of the direct and instant heat.

Stir the onions to ensure they don’t get stuck or burnt. While your onions are cooking, in a small bowl, combine the minced garlic, grated ginger, and dry masala. Add a splash of water (I like to use warm) and mix it all together so it combines into a paste.

Once the onions are softened, add the caraway or coriander seeds. Ensure there’s enough hot oil in there to coat the seeds – stir it together and cook until they are toasted. Then, add your spice paste and stir it all together to toast the spices and cook the garlic and ginger.

While this is happening, drain and rinse your chickpeas. Add them to the pot next and stir to coat everything equally in the spices. Next, add the diced tomatoes. This provides some liquid to cook the chickpeas further til they’re soft. If it looks dry, add a little water. Add the bay leaf now and stir.

Bring it to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Put a lid on and let it go for at least 20 minutes, better at an hour or even more. Continue to stir it every so often and ensure there is enough liquid; you don’t want it to burn to the bottom but you also don’t want it to come out too liquidy at the end. You need to scoop it up with fry bread!

Note on curry powders

Holy mackerel are there a LOT of curry powders out there. There’s Japanese curry, Thai curry, Indian curry, Island curry, and so on, and within each type of cuisine there are a number of variations as far as spice combination goes. For a successful chana masala, you will want a MASALA MIX or a CHANA MASALA MIX. Look for a spice mix that contains coriander, clove, cinnamon, chili, turmeric, and ginger. Chana masala should be heavy on ginger, coriander, and – believe it or not – lemon! You don’t want any lime flavour, nor cumin. If you want to make your own spice mix, use those listed above. A little cardamom wouldn’t hurt either. The “pie spices” complement the chickpea and tomato in chana masala. If you want to vary the spiciness of your dish, making your own spice mix is a great idea. You can chop fresh chilies in with the garlic and ginger, or add chili powder or cayenne with the dry spices.

Fry Bread

This part is super easy. While your chana is simmering, make some bread dough. My bread yeast was dead, so I used instant pizza yeast and actually just made a pizza dough. You don’t have to spice it – just salt it. You don’t need much, either. When you fry the dough, it’ll puff up and bubble so you can cut it open and put chana inside it. YUM.

To deep fry, choose a deep pot with a small diameter. Fill it with about 2 inches of oil with a high smoke point (sunflower/canola/veg oil) and heat it on high. Ensure you have a plate next to the stove with paper towel on it to drain, as well as a metal or silicon (NOT PLASTIC) slotted spoon, tongs, etc. You’ll know it’s ready when you put a wooden spoon in, touching the bottom, and little bubbles immediately rise from the wood. BE VERY CAREFUL if you are new to deep-frying! Tear off little chunks of bread dough and toss them in – do no more than three at a time so the oil doesn’t lose too much temperature. Watch them turn golden, turning if necessary, and then pull out to drain. Serve hot.

Oh, and I won the cookoff with this dish.

October 12th, 2012 Lavender Snickerdoodles posted by malloreigh in Dessert & Photos & Recipes

I thought I had posted this recipe here but when I came back to the website to search for it I didn’t find it! What an oversight on my part – this is one of my most famous recipes ever. I infused these snickerdoodles (sugar cookies with cinnamon) with lavender after smelling my lavender hair conditioner and cinnamon-sugar soap at the same time in the shower. True story! Anyway, I’ve been making these for years. Add more lavender flowers if you really like the flavour – up to double the amount will simply make them more fragrant and delicious.

These cookies are quite crumbly, soft, and dry when baked according to the directions. I am working on altering the recipe to produce a moister cookie that is easier to form.

Vegan Lavender Snickerdoodles

1.5 cups flour
1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 teaspoon lavender flowers, dried and crushed
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 tablespoon maple syrup, agave nectar, or brown rice syrup
1 egg substitute (I use 1 tsp ground flaxseed whisked with a scant 3 tbsp apple juice, non-dairy milk, or water)

Cinnamon sugar mixture to coat

Mix dry ingredients in a large bowl. Mix wet ingredients in a medium bowl. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and mix together until an even dough forms.

Cover the bowl and set it in the refrigerator for half an hour.

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Roll one-inch cookie dough balls in the cinnamon sugar mixture and place on an ungreased cookie sheet. Flatten each with a fork.

Bake for 6 – 7 minutes. Watch closely – you want the cookies to be golden but soft. They take exactly 6 minutes in my oven but have taken 8 – 10 in someone else’s.

Makes 20 cookies, give or take, depending on how much dough you eat.

June 20th, 2012 Sticky Rice Risotto Balls posted by malloreigh in Photos & Recipes & Snacks

I made these sticky rice risotto balls for one of our vegan cookoffs. Everyone loved them!

sticky rice risotto balls
Photo by Jen

For the risotto

4 shallots
2 tbsp sesame oil
2 tbsp veg oil
2 cups shiitake mushrooms
2 cups glutinous (sticky) rice
1/2 cup sake, soju, or white wine
7 – 8 cups hot miso broth
1 tbsp tamari or soya sauce
1/2 cup green onion or chive, chopped
Salt, to taste

I tend to go overboard on oil when I make cookoff entries, so you could potentially half this. Heat a large, deep skillet or saucepan over medium heat, then add the shallots. Stir often with a (preferably slotted) wooden spoon until soft. Add chopped shiitake mushrooms and saute, stirring often, until soft. Add the tamari to the broth. Add the rice and sake/soju/wine; stir and let come to a simmer. Once the level of the liquid has gone down, add a cup of broth, stir, and let come to a simmer; let the liquid get low, then add another cup broth. Repeat, stirring often, adding liquid every 5 – 10 minutes, until the rice is cooked – this should take 30 – 40 minutes. Test for al dente and remove from heat. Add salt and green onion, stir to incorporate, taste for flavour, and add more soy sauce or tamari if it’s lacking.

Now you will want your risotto to cool. If you have heaps of time, you can just leave it out, but I put mine in the fridge for about an hour.

Once it’s cooled, lay out some wax paper and start forming them into balls. You can do these whatever size you like.

To stuff

I made a mixture of silken tofu, Daiya, miso, and tamari, but it might be better with some nicely marinated tofu inside, chopped into small pieces. You also don’t need to stuff them at all.

To stuff, flatten a risotto ball, put a small amount of stuffing on top, wrap it up like a purse, and close with a pinch of your fingers. Re-roll gently into a ball.

To crust

1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup panko
1 tbsp sesame seeds
for the egg wash:
1 tsp ground flax
3 tbsp hot water

Mix the flax and water for an egg wash. Put the flour in a shallow bowl or saucer; do the same for the panko, but add the sesame seeds and mix. Dip each ball first into flour, then into the flax mixture, then into the panko and sesame seeds.

To fry

Enough oil to submerge your risotto balls in; you are deep frying. If you don’t want to do that, feel free to bake them. They are still delicious this way.

Heat the oil at medium until dropping a piece of rice into it sets it to rolling and fizzing. Fry each ball til it’s golden brown – BE CAREFUL – and remove gently with heat-safe tongs to a plate covered with paper towel to drain.

I served these with a swipe of creamy Japanese sesame-citrus salad dressing. This will do, or a rice vinegar-soy sauce, plum sauce, or any other dip. Eat with chopsticks or place each one on a toothpick for party-friendly finger foods.

May 8th, 2012 Gluten-Free Green Onion and Spinach Pancakes topped with fenugreek butter and Arugula Salad with Hazelnut Vinaigrette posted by kaylie in Breakfast/Brunch & Product Reviews

savoury gluten-free green onion and spinach pancakes with spring arugula and hazelnut salad and housemade coconut yogurt - 2

This recipe was conceptualized by Yotem Ottolenghi in his cookbook “Plenty”, I made it vegan and gltuen-free for our april brunch.  The recipe I have is not exact therefore I am not going to put it up on our website. I strongly suggest picking up the cookbook “Plenty” and playing around with some of his recipes. The book is simple and does justice to the vegetables that he works with. Simple.

April 12th, 2012 Blue Corn Pear Muffins posted by kaylie in Breakfast/Brunch & Dessert & Photos

 

Photo http://www.lospoblanos.com/food-and-dining/recipes/

This Recipe comes from one of my favourite places in Albuquerque, New Mexico. When We visit again we will definitely be staying here http://www.lospoblanos.com/.  This is the veganized adaptation of the blue corn muffins from Los Poblanos.

1 Cup Blue Corn flour

2 1/2 C All Purpose Flour

1 3/4 C Sugar

2 Tsp Baking Powder

1 Tsp Baking Soda

1/2 Tsp Salt

1/2 Pound Earth Balance (melted)

3/4 C Almond Milk

1 TBSP Apple Cider Vinegar

2 Tsp Vanilla Extract

1 Tsp Cayenne (if you like it spicy)

2 C small diced pears

2 Tbsp ground flax (mixed with 1/4 C warm water)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Using the pan grease, grease the muffin tins well. Sift the dry ingredients into a bowl.  Add the melted earth balance and add the remaining wet ingredients. Mix until just combined. Fold in the pears. Fill the muffin tin and bake for 20-25 minutes.

 

 

April 7th, 2012 Barbecue Sunchokes (Jerusalem Artichoke) posted by kaylie in Dinner & Lunch & Meta & Photos & Recipes & Sides

Photo taken from http://tinyurl.com/7pyo3p5

Ingredients:

5 medium sized Sunchokes  (sliced)

1/2 Tsp Cumin

1/2 Tsp Caraway

Salt

Pepper

1/2 C Your choice of delicious bbq sauce

3 Tbsp Oil

- Heat oil over medium heat in a sauté pan and add sunchokes covering with a lid in order to steam them through.

- Add Cumin, Caraway, Salt and pepper and toss. Continue to cook and keep covered for approx 2 minutes.

- Add 1/4 c bbq sauce. Toss and keep covered for 5-8 mins. Toss constantly.

- Add the remainder of the bbq sauce and salt and turn up the heat. Toss and caramelize the sunchokes making sure they have nice brown edges. Remove from heat and serve.

 

April 7th, 2012 The New Veganminster Project posted by malloreigh in Guest Contributors & Meta

Our pal Melissa is building an excellent vegan community of businesses in Vancouver suburb New Westminster, and she’s giving away a stay there for two lucky folks. Interested? Read on…

Win a Luxurious Vegan Culinary Getaway for Two!

New Westminster, B.C. – Look out Portland there’s a new vegan culinary destination carving out it’s territory in the Pacific Northwest and hungry visitors don’t have to cross the border or check the exchange rate to get there. Nestled between the mighty Fraser River and the ultra convenient sky train New Westminster is a hot bed of vegan foodie activity and for the month of April this Royal City is showing off it’s Top Chef worthy dining experiences.

Although visitors may not need their government issue passports in order to get to New Westminster (unless of course they originate Stateside) what they will require is to pick up a New Veganminster Passport to gain entry to this exciting event. Once a New Veganminster Passport has been collected from either Shine Wellness Space, Coming Home Café, Karmavore Vegan Shop or Crepe Des Amis participants are urged to taste their way through the city enjoying some truly sensational culinary delights!

Once a New Veganminster Passport has been turned in at the end of April participants will be eligible to win this incredible, tasty prize package for two:
Our Getaway Grand Prize:
• One Night Deluxe Accommodation at The Inn at the Quay
• Welcome Basket From Karmavore Vegan Shop
• Lunch from Crepe Des Amis at the Fabulous River Market
• Guided Tour from Fraser River Bike Tours & Rentals
• A Dinner Feast at Wild Rice
• Delicious Breakfast at Coming Home Cafe
• Yoga Class Package at Shine Wellness Space
Our Stunning Second Prize:

• Wine Tasting for Two at Pacific Breeze Winery
The total winnings for this incredible vegan prize package is approximately $450! The Ultimate Vegan Getaway Contest runs from April 2nd to April 30th and participants are required to purchase an item of delicious vegan food in order to receive a stamp in their passports. For more information and for contest rules please visit http://www.thehungrytaurus.com/events/.

About Melissa Balfour
Melissa Balfour is a culinary event planner as well as a food activist blogger at The Hungry Taurus (thehungrytaurus.com). Searching for a cause and a way to make a difference in the world Melissa started the New Veganminster Project as a way to turn her city into the next Vegan Mecca of the Pacific Northwest. By highlighting existing vegan friendly establishments and meeting with potential new ones Melissa is helping to promote the plant based lifestyle one restaurant meal at a time. You can follow her on twitter @hungrytaurus.
To arrange an interview with Melissa Balfour please call 778.235.7020 or email thehungrytaurus@gmail.com

March 19th, 2012 vegan abroad: review of Marmalade Restaurant in San Juan, PR posted by gunstreetgirl in Guest Contributors & Photos & Restaurant Reviews

Following is a guest review by a good friend of ours who recently visited a veg-friendly restaurant in Puerto Rico. Let’s all imagine we’re drinking cocktails in the sun while we read it…

In late February I had the pleasure of visiting San Juan with my mom. Since holidays with my family are always an excuse to consume obscene amounts of delicious food, we wasted no time looking up the best places to eat. Marmalade is located in a restaurant-laden area of the beautiful district of Old San Juan, and its atmosphere is classy and open while still being funky and intimate. Backpackers be warned: this meal is not going to come cheap, but I assure you it is worth every cent — what’s a vacation if you don’t treat yourself?

glow bar

Before I talk about the food, I’ll just say that the service was incredible — attentive, accommodating, and knowledgeable without being imposing or pretentious. When I mentioned I was reviewing for a vegan food blog, our waiter was not only eager to point out appropriate items on the menu, but even asked the chef for a copy of the menu for me to take home (which he apparently doesn’t do for just anybody). The chef himself — Peter Schintler, an accomplished gentleman who studied under Gordon Ramsay — came out later on to talk with us about the food and the blog, and vegan/vegetarian food in general. Apparently his wife is vegetarian so he doesn’t find it difficult to cook without meat or dairy, and often will at home. I also appreciate his willingness to make something for everyone by leaving items out or altering dishes to meet dietary restrictions or allergies, something many chefs would consider akin to ruining the food.

Marmalade has a full page of vegetarian items on their extensive menu, and nearly all of these are or can easily be made vegan, which our wonderful server assured me would not be a problem. You can order à la carte if you’d like, but I recommend doing one of the tasting menus, which gives you four, five, or six smaller courses (including dessert, for $59, $69, and $79 respectively). I did five courses (though it was a bit much for me, admittedly), of which three were vegan.

sweet corn and lemongrass soup

The first dish I tried was the delectable sweet corn and lemongrass soup, which came poured over a salsa of haas avocado, grilled corn, red onion, and organic sprouts, and topped with sunflower shoots. The sweetness of the corn was offset by the tart pieces of avocado, and it had a pleasantly spicy finish. The texture and creaminess were reminiscent of a chowder, but the flavour palate was completely unique. I’m a big soup lover, but it’s not terribly often I have a soup in a restaurant that really blows my mind. This one did.

ratatouille

For the main course, I went with the ratatouille (I asked to have the goat cheese left off). This hearty provençal vegetable stew featured potato, spinach, zucchini, and a handmade roasted red pepper sheet pasta in a creamy tomato sauce, topped with pine nuts, sunflower shoots, and candied black olives. The sauce was so beautifully creamy that I actually double-checked with the server to make sure it was, in fact, vegan (he was jokingly offended that I would even ask). All the vegetables were cooked to perfection — no mealy potatoes or squishy zucchini to be found here — and each individual flavour was brought out. I don’t recommend ordering this as your last of four dinner courses, like I did; it’s quite filling so I could barely manage half of it, much to my own disappointment.

lemon-chamomile sorbet
Thankfully, there’s always room in the dessert stomach, and I had the lemon-chamomile sorbet*. This soft and delicately flavoured sorbet was punctuated with crisp pieces of sesame-peanut brittle. Certainly a combination I’d never encountered before, but it worked wonderfully, and its cool, light sweetness was the perfect finish for someone like me who had eaten too much but still wanted dessert.
*please note: this dish has honeycomb in it, but since most vegans I know are okay with honey, I felt I could include it here.

Overall, I think Marmalade was honestly one of the best restaurant experiences I have ever had. Not once were we kept waiting, not once was a bite of food I put in my mouth anything short of incredible, and not once did I feel rushed or uncomfortable. But the pinnacle of service that goes above and beyond? When we arrived, we had just been caught in an impressive rainstorm and had been using my mom’s scarf to shield our heads. Thus, it was completely soaked and she asked our server if he could hang it somewhere for her. When he gave it back to her at the end of the night, he hadn’t merely hung it up — it was still warm from being in the dryer!

I truly hope that anyone planning a trip to San Juan, or any Puerto Ricans who may be reading this, will devote an evening to visiting this delightful and creative restaurant.

all photos by me, from my flickr

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