Monthly Archives: November 2010

Tofu Benedict – Vegan Breakfast Stack Cooking Video – Indian Style Curry Benny

Last weekend, I didn’t have my camera – I’d left it at a friend’s house – so when Kaylie and I started putting together this incredible breakfast, we decided to record it on video. After many painstaking hours subtitling it for the deaf and hard of hearing, during which iMovie crashed as if on a 15-minute schedule, the video is done! Voila, here’s Kaylie and I being dorky!

In this video, I used a variation on the tofu egg patty I keep talking about but which I feel nobody has actually tried to make. (That’s okay, it means you’ll come to my restaurant someday, right?)

Let us know if you want some more clarification on how we did anything in this video – I personally think K should share the recipe for those potato rice cakes.

Follow Friday: Vegan Food Blog Lovin’ for Kathy @ Lunch Box Bunch

There are not many food blogs that give me food envy. After all, I live with an incredible vegan cook, and we eat well – but Healthy Happy Life / Kblog.LunchBoxBunch.Com is one food blog that regularly gives me not only food envy, but time envy, and photo envy. If you ditch VM to follow any other blog, make it that one! It’s so worth it! But hopefully you have enough attention points to follow us both.


I am actually not sure how Kathy cooks, blogs, and photographs so much and so well.

Handmade Butternut Squash and Oyster Mushroom Ravioli

butternut squash and oyster mushroom ravioli tossed with kale pesto, with kale and red capsicum

I made my own pasta from scratch for the first time using this guide. Of course I did this for a cook-off; I rarely go to so much effort for myself and Kaylie doesn’t eat at home too much lately. (She’s been developing a new menu at Perch which means a lot of food testing.) You’ll want to have your filling prepared before you make the pasta, because once you start, your hands will be busy for quite a while.

If you don’t want to make pasta from scratch, you can easily go buy spring roll or won ton wrappers and use them instead. Check the ingredients as some have eggs or other crap in them. Vegan ones are fairly easy to find.

You can serve these with a variety of sauces. I made a limey red curry sauce (delicious with ravioli), hence the ginger in the filling, but we also ate them tossed in pesto (as pictured above). Your call. You could eat them with a plain old tomato sauce, or just with margarine!

Filling

1 butternut squash
1 tbsp oil
5 cloves garlic
1 loose cup oyster mushrooms (approximate – I used 1/2 a “container”) – alternately use any kind of mushroom, diced, or skip mushrooms altogether
Salt
1+ tbsp Earth Balance or other margarine
1 tsp ground ginger or other spices – your choice for flavour (tarragon, cumin, or rosemary would be nice)

Preheat your oven to 350. Slice the butternut squash in half lengthwise, brush the cut sides with oil, and lay cut side down on a baking sheet. Throw the garlic cloves (still wrapped) on the sheet too. Put it in the oven and roast for 45 minutes – 1 hour, until the squash is soft to a spoon. Your garlic might start to burn – take it out when it’s loose in its skin.

While your squash and garlic is roasting, separate the oyster mushroom heads from their stems. The stems are a lot tougher – you’ll use both but you’ll have to cook the stems longer. To cook the mushrooms, either brush them with olive oil and throw them in with your squash and garlic for about ten minutes, or saute them in a frying pan with a touch of oil.

Start making the pasta dough while you’re roasting squash – you’ll have some downtime.

Once the squash is soft and somewhat caramelized, scoop it out of its skin with a spoon and mash it with salt, margarine, and ginger. If you choose to forgo mushrooms, you might want to add some more spices.

ravioli - butternut squash filling

Handmade Pasta

1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
2/3 cup liquid
1 tsp oil

Combine the flour and salt. Add the oil to the liquid; if you want flavoured pasta, substitute tomato paste, pureed spinach, curry, or whatever you like for part of the liquid. I steeped lime leaves and fennel in 2/3 cup boiling water til it cooled and used that to make my dough. Add the liquid to the dough. Mix until it starts to form a ball.

Turn the dough out on to a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic – about ten minutes. Add more flour whenever necessary to keep the dough (and your hands) from getting sticky. Wrap the dough in plastic and let it sit for ten minutes. (I let mine sit for an hour and a half while I went to go pick up a mattress, but I don’t recommend it, because it mega stuck to the plastic wrap.)

Separate the dough into eight; take one eighth of it and wrap the rest to keep it moist. Roll the dough out on a floured surface until it’s as thin as you can make it. Cut it into shapes – I made squares, but rectangles and triangles are nice too. Don’t stack your noodles! You’ll want to hang them ’til you use them; following the instructions, I temporarily hung mine on my cooling rack.

ravioli - drying

Now that your noodles are prepared, you’re ready to stuff your ravioli. Spoon a little bit of squash and a piece or two of mushroom on to each piece of dough – I do about eight at a time. Fold them over and press the edges with a fork to crimp them closed. I like to press them from the top and the bottom.

Yes, there are a lot! You can easily make about 50 ravioli with this recipe. If you get tired of making ravioli, slice your fresh pasta into long thin noodles or any type of noodle you like. You can dry them and keep them.

ravioli - folding

Once you’re ready to eat them (after you’ve spent your entire life folding ravioli), all you need to do is drop each one in boiling water, then remove it with a slotted spoon once it floats – about 3 minutes. After the boiling step, you can eat them right away, or you can fry them or bake them if you want a less slippery texture.

How impressive! You’ve just made ravioli – from scratch!