Tag Archives: tofu

Shakshuka and a Vegan Poached Egg

Yesterday was the Vegan Cookoff – the theme was Middle Eastern and North African food. I just had to make shakshuka, a pepper and tomato stew that originated in Tunisia and is popular across the MENA region. It’s often served for breakfast with poached eggs swimming in the thick, sweet sauce, and what a great opportunity to discover some new vegan egg tactics while using some of my old favourites.

shakshuka
Before tomatoes, after peppers and spices

SHAKSHUKA

I based this shakshuka recipe after Yotam Ottolenghi‘s, with a few elements from other shakshuka recipes I found online – I subbed out Yotam’s cayenne for fresh jalapeno, and had (surprise!) run out of saffron so I did not use that. I also didn’t have fresh cilantro/coriander on hand so went with dried. Ottolenghi didn’t use garlic, and I chose not to use thyme. The balance in my shakshuka was perfect, but you wouldn’t lose using his recipe either.

1/2 tsp cumin seeds
200mL extra virgin olive oil – use the good stuff because you will really taste it
2 yellow onions, sliced
5 cloves garlic, minced
2 red bell peppers, seeded and sliced into 1cm wide strips
1 yellow and 1 orange bell pepper, prepared as above
2 jalapenos, roughly chopped
2 tbsp organic raw sugar
2 bay leaves
1.5 tbsp dried coriander
Handful fresh parsley (be generous)
4 large or 6 small tomatoes, roughly chopped
Salt and pepper to taste

In your largest, deepest cast iron frying pan (or use a saucepan if you don’t have a cast iron), dry toast the cumin seeds on high for about 2 min until they are brown in colour. Add the olive oil and turn the heat down to medium-high. Once the oil is hot, add the onions and cook for about 2 – 3 minutes until they start to soften, then add the garlic and cook for another 3 – 5 minutes until the whole mixture is looking dewy. Add all of your peppers, sugar, and spices and cook for 10 – 20 minutes, stirring regularly, until the peppers soften and the whole thing is taking on a red-orange colour. Add tomatoes and cook for another 10 min, then taste. Add salt and pepper and adjust everything else for spice if you need to; remove the bay leaves at this point as well, if you can find them.

If you’re adding the eggs, ensure your stew is nicely broken down first – it should have a thick consistency, a nice level of sweetness and a gentle heat.

Vegan Poached Eggs

1. WHITE

The recipe for the white is based off of one from Chel Rabbit which the author used in their shakshuka.

either 1/2 cup soaked raw cashews, pureed into a cream, or 1/4 cup vegenaise
1/4 lemon worth of zest
1/4 tsp onion powder
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/8 tsp black salt aka kala namak (i get this at buy low in the indian spices section)
i also added 1/8 tsp asafoetida aka hing, another indian spice that i don’t expect anyone else to have – because i didn’t have onion powder
soft organic tofu – don’t use the vacuum packed kind!
Combine all ingredients except for tofu and blend til smooth.

2. YOLK

If you’re a Vegan Mischief follower, you’ll be familiar with this yolk recipe – I found it on a website called The Airy Way and adapted it here for Vegan Mischief.

1 tbsp vegenaise
1 tbsp carrot juice or v8 (this is just for colour)
4 tbsp vegetable broth
2 tbsp earth balance
2 tsp cornstarch

This recipe is designed to be “poached” in a stew. You could probably also use it in other contexts but you’d have to alter the preparation a little bit.

Make holes in your stew for your eggs – I made 5. Spoon in a tablespoonful of the creamy white mixture and smooth it into the hole. Scoop out a tablespoonful of soft tofu and place it on top. This is going to be the texture of the white, while the cream is the taste. Let your stew simmer with the white in it for 8-10 minutes so the flavours combine – don’t stir, of course, or you’ll wreck your eggs.

In the meantime, prepare your yolk. If you have a microwave, this is a bit easier, but I have done it on a stovetop before as well. Combine all of the ingredients in a small bowl or small skillet and melt – in a microwave, zap for 20 seconds and then whisk. On a stovetop, melt and then whisk. Now, the key is to warm it and whisk it until it is a creamy bechamel or egg yolk consistency, and then IMMEDIATELY remove it from heat because if it gets past that point it will separate. If it separates, it still tastes good but it looks gross. In the microwave, zap for 5 second increments, whisk, and then put it back in if you still need to. On the stovetop, warm gently while whisking until it’s perfect.

Scoop a teaspoonful of yolk into the centre of each white. Turn the heat off and serve. Shakshuka is usually served straight out of the cast iron – bring it to the table with some fresh toasted flatbread and a big serving spoon and let your dining companions feast on it in the messiest way possible!

Momo-style dumplings

tibetan-style ginger, green onion, garlic, tofu, broccoli, red pepper, mushroom momos with a citrus-soy-sesame dipping sauce

I can’t believe I haven’t posted the simple, glorious recipe for these little momos! Now, momo is maybe not the right word for what these are. There’s this really great Himalayan restaurant I love going to (Cafe Kathmandu on the Drive) and they have these delectable little dumplings called momos that you can order steamed or deep fried. They are just the best. Kaylie and I thought we’d give making them at home a go, and the worked pretty well.

We used wonton wrappers for these. I have heard that others have had a hard time finding egg-free wonton wrappers – I get mine at Superstore where the selection is large enough that you can find eggless ones. You might consider using rice wraps as well – that way they’re gluten free as well. To use the rice wraps, simply hydrate them for about twenty seconds in water. They are much bigger than wonton wrappers so maybe tear or cut them into pieces after they’re hydrated. If you over-hydrate them they will dissolve so be careful.

The vegetable/tofu mix can change according to your tastes. Feel free to play with it. Try diced carrots, bell peppers, or water chestnuts. We combined:

1/4 block firm tofu, crumbled
2 tbsp soya sauce, tamari, or Braggs
1 tsp rice wine vinegar
Sprinkle Chinese five-spice mix or coriander (use chopped fresh leaves if available)
3 stalks green onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 inch ginger, peeled and grated
1/2 – 1 cup mushrooms (measure before dicing – any type of mushroom you like)
1 tsp sesame oil or other oil

Pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients together and toss in a pan on medium-heat for about five minutes. Let the mixture cool.

Now, to wrap your momos, place a rounded teaspoon of filling in the centre of a wonton wrapper. Wet your fingers in a bowl of water and bring the corners of the wrapper up, then twist. Seal with more water.

These can be frozen and then steamed. Steam them until the wonton wrappers become translucent – about eight minutes from frozen.

Momo dipping sauce

Mix sesame oil, rice wine vinegar, and soya sauce together until they’re tasty. I’d say about one part sesame oil, 4 parts soya sauce, and 2 parts vinegar.

Malloreigh’s Semi-Famous Tofu Scramble

malloreigh's tofu scram

I won’t lie – this is one of my most successful dishes. I perfected the recipe about four years ago and haven’t looked back. It employs several of my favourite ingredients, which you will find in many of my signature recipes. For more information about what these ingredients are and where to get them, check out our ingredients & tools page.

In lieu of fenugreek leaves, you might want to try tarragon, or even basil.

1 block firm tofu, drained
3+ tbsp nutritional yeast
1/4 tsp salt, or to taste
1+ tbsp dried fenugreek leaves
1 tbsp dijon mustard
1/2 cup full-fat coconut milk
1/2 onion, diced
1+ tbsp vegetable oil for frying
2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
2 handfuls mushrooms, bite-sized or chopped
1 crown broccoli, separated into bite-sized pieces
1/2 red pepper, chopped
1/2 small zucchini, chopped

Note: omit some vegetables if you like, or add different ones – mind your cooking times.

Crumble tofu into a bowl. (It’s easier to crumble a block of tofu if you slice it first.) Add nutritional yeast, fenugreek, salt, mustard, and 2 – 3 tbsp of coconut milk. Mix until the tofu is evenly coated. Add more nutritional yeast or fenugreek here.

Sauté onion in oil in a medium-sized, deep-walled frying pan over medium heat until soft. Add garlic and mushrooms; toss and cook for 2 minutes. Add the tofu and cook, tossing regularly, until golden – about 10 minutes. Add the broccoli, red pepper, zucchini, and the rest of the coconut milk, mix, and cover. Let it steam for 5 – 6 minutes until the broccoli is bright green and tender.

Serve with hot EB’d toast.

In The Absence of Tortillas, a Mexican Bowl

in the absence of tortillas, a mexican bowl

Who wants tortillas from a grocery store anyways? I find the politically correct mexican bowl to be one of my favourite dishes because it’s fast, flavourful, easy and reminds me of my mom.

This particular bowl consisted of:

Chipotlé lime baked tofu cubes
Roasted garlic potatoes
Pinto beans
Garnished with fresh tomato, lettuce, salsa, avocado and roasted zucchini.

You could replace the potatoes with rice or spanish rice, sautéed vegetables for tofu and black beans for pinto beans.

Try replacing salsa with a tomatillo sauce  or try adding guacamole.

chipotlé lime tofu

1/2 block extra firm tofu
Juice of 1/2 lime (about 1 tbsp)
1 tsp lime zest
1 small can of chipotlé in adobo sauce or  1 tsp chipotlé seasoning
1 tsp garlic salt
1/4 small yellow onion minced
1 tbs oil

Cut tofu into 1cm cubes and place into a medium sized bowl. If using canned chipotlé use one pepper and mince put into bowl with tofu along with all of the other ingredients. Let the tofu marinate for at least fifteen minutes and place in oven at 400 degrees for fifteen minutes. This recipe is spicy!

Portobello & red wine tomato sauce, kale, lemon and caramelized onion tofu scramble

anniversary breakfast - scrambled tofu and toast

After a long night of drinking, kissing and eating it’s important to reinvigorate your body with a flavourful breakfast. It isn’t to hard to use elements of last night dinner to create a tofu scram that is more satisfying than the dinner you had the night before.

Things you need:

1 yellow onion (cut into rings)

4 cloves of garlic (minced)

5 kale leaves

1 C Portabello & Red Wine Tomato Sauce (refer to prior post)

2 Tbs vegan margarine

1 lemon

1/2 small zucchini

cherry tomatoes, sliced in half

6 white button mushrooms

1 tps Tarragon

Salt


Place garlic, 1 tsp salt, 1/2 block tofu, & portobello tomato sauce in a bowl and let set until you are done prepping everything else.

In a skillet, sauté onions rings with vegan margarine until slightly brown and caramelized.  Add sliced mushrooms, cherry tomatoes and tarragon until mushrooms and tomatoes are slightly soft. Add tofu mix, a pinch of salt and kale. Let simmer stirring occasionally for about 10 minutes in total. Add zucchini last and only let the whole mixture sauté for only 3 minutes more, you don’t want your zucchini to be over cooked!

Plate your scram and add a squirt of lemon juice on top!

Make toast, slice fruit, pour coffee and eat!

Tofu Benedict – Vegan Breakfast Stack Cooking Video – Indian Style Curry Benny

Last weekend, I didn’t have my camera – I’d left it at a friend’s house – so when Kaylie and I started putting together this incredible breakfast, we decided to record it on video. After many painstaking hours subtitling it for the deaf and hard of hearing, during which iMovie crashed as if on a 15-minute schedule, the video is done! Voila, here’s Kaylie and I being dorky!

In this video, I used a variation on the tofu egg patty I keep talking about but which I feel nobody has actually tried to make. (That’s okay, it means you’ll come to my restaurant someday, right?)

Let us know if you want some more clarification on how we did anything in this video – I personally think K should share the recipe for those potato rice cakes.

What Kind of Tofu Do I Buy?

When I first made the switch to veganism, I hated tofu. It was a flavourless, jellylike mass with all the bad and none of the good qualities of desserts served at daycares. And for a vegan, not liking tofu can be a serious problem. Over time, as I learned about the different types of tofu available, I learned to love it. So, if you’re new to tofu, if you’re cooking for a tofu-eater, or if you’re trying to learn to love tofu, you might find this guide useful.


Click through to read the entire post. Continue reading

Vegan Chicken Salad Sandwiches

chicken salad sandwich

Yeah, just eating a delicious vegan “chicken” salad sandwich for lunch, no big deal. I’m actually eating this very sandwich as I write! That is how fast/bored I am today. Do you want to make your very own vegan chicken salad? I dare you! Do it! Then eat it on a sammich with lettuce, red onion, and tomato, just like me!

This recipe makes enough for a couple of stacked sandwiches. Double the recipe for double the salad. Duh.

Tofu “Chicken” Salad

1/2 block firm tofu, pressed, and cut into li’l cubes
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp mustard (go for the dijon)
1 tbsp total chicken spices – try marjoram, sage, rosemary – I like dill
Salt & Pepper

Toss your tofu cubes in the rest of the ingredients listed. Now that the tofu is marinating, preheat your oven to 250 F.
Spread your tofu out on a baking pan (make sure nothing’s piled up or touching) and bake 10 minutes. Take it out, toss it, put it back in for another 7 minutes. Repeat this process once more. You’re trying to get a golden finish on most edges of the tofu.
You could probably also fry it if you wanted to save time but I bake it.

In a small bowl, combine:
1/4 cup vegan mayonnaise (I prefer Vegenaise – in a pinch, use silken tofu)
1 stick celery, chopped
1 – 2 dill pickles, diced
1 – 2 tbsp capers (optional)
1 tbsp dill pickle juice or caper juice from the jar
1 – 2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
Salt & pepper

Add the tofu to this mixture and toss it together. Let it sit, covered, in the fridge until you’re ready to use it.

spinach, mushroom, tomato, and ‘egg’ over garlic hash


Oh, baby. Another triumph of the tofu egg patty I’ve been making. If you haven’t tried this yet, you really should. We served it over a pile of garlic hashbrowns, tomato, and spinach, with barely-fried white mushrooms and a thin gravy made with tahini and nutritional yeast.

I’m going to try a few different approaches with the egg patty. I think I want to get the extra firm tofu, drain it and slightly press it, slice it, and then marinate it in the thick mixture of coconut cream, miso, nutritional yeast, and mustard. Then I want to heat some oil up very, very hot in a pan and flash-fry the soaked tofu on each side, to retain a melty-soft texture inside. If you try it before I do, let me know how it works.